December 1, 2021

Dollarpennysaver

Save Every Penny

No-Knead Italian Bread Recipe | Leite’s Culinaria

4 min read

No-knead Italian bread is a lot easier than you. might think. The kneading is replaced by a longer rise time, so you’ll need to plan ahead but the rustic, crusty, chewy bread is definitely worth the wait.

A no-knead Italian bread loaf, topped with sesame seeds on a black floured surface with a bowl of oil, brush, bowl of sesame seeds, and an eggshell lying beside it.

This no-knead Italian bread is every bit as simple to make as the name suggests. Seriously. With only 10 minutes of effort, you can make a loaf of bread that easily rivals one you’d buy at your favorite artisan bakery with a chewy crust and a light crumb. The only catch? You have to remember to start it the night before.–Angie Zoobkoff

How does no-knead bread work?

The reason this recipe works, despite being no-knead, is that the bread has a long rising time of 12 to 18 hours to create a risen texture. The inspiration for this recipe was an article published in the New York Times several years ago that featured a revolutionary no-knead bread by Jim Lahey of Sullivan Street Bakery. In addition to making bread, you can use this recipe to make dough for pizza and focaccia.

No-Knead Italian Bread

A no-knead Italian bread loaf, topped with sesame seeds on a black floured surface with a bowl of oil, brush, bowl of sesame seeds, and an eggshell lying beside it.

No-knead Italian bread is a lot easier than you. might think. The kneading is replaced by a longer rise time, so you’ll need to plan ahead but the rustic, crusty, chewy bread is definitely worth the wait.

Josh Kilmer-Purcell | Brent Ridge

Prep 10 mins

Cook 40 mins

Total 16 hrs

  • In a large bowl, stir together the semolina flour, 00 flour, all-purpose flour, salt, and yeast. Add the lukewarm water and stir until the ingredients form into a slightly dry, shaggy dough, about 1 minute. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap to keep in the moisture and let the dough rise at room temperature (between 65º and 75ºF or 18° to 24°C) for at least 12 hours and up to 18 hours. After this time, the surface of the dough should be covered with small bubbles and the dough should have risen significantly.
  • If you’re making a round or rectangular loaf, gently run a spoon around the bowl to deflate the dough. Use the spoon to gently fold the dough over itself. Let the dough rest for 15 minutes. If you’re making a braided loaf, flour a board or surface with 1/4 cup all-purpose flour and turn the dough out onto it. Deflate the dough by pressing and kneading the flour into the dough until the dough no longer feels quite as sticky. Roll the dough into a long loaf. Cut the loaf into 3 equal pieces and, using your hands, roll each piece evenly into a rope about 12 inches long. Place the ropes on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Braid the bread starting in the middle of the ropes. Take the left rope and cross it over the middle piece. Take the right rope and cross it over the rope that is now in the middle. Repeat crossing left over center, followed by right over center until you reach the end, as if you’re braiding hair. Pinch the bottom ends together and tuck them under the loaf. Repeat for the other side. Cover and let rise until doubled in size.
  • If you’re making a round or rectangular loaf, spread about 1/4 cup semolina flour onto a cotton dish towel. Take the dough out of the bowl and use your hands to shape the dough into a rectangle or ball, depending on the shape of your pot or Dutch oven. The dough will be sticky and shaggy. Fold the dough into thirds and place the dough seam-side down on the dishtowel. Sprinkle some more semolina on the bread. Bring the sides of the towel over the bread to cover loosely. Let the dough rise until double its original size, about 2 hours. If you’re making a braided loaf, move on to step 4.
  • While the dough is rising, place an oven rack in the middle position and preheat the oven to 450ºF (230°C).

  • About 30 minutes before the dough is finished rising, place a heavy clay-covered, ceramic, or cast iron pot or Dutch oven with a minimum size of 3 quarts into the oven and heat the pot while the dough finishes rising.

  • If desired, after the dough has risen, lightly brush it with melted butter or lightly beaten egg white and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Remove the pot from the oven, gently lift the dough from the towel, and place it into the pot seam side up. Cover the pot and bake for 30 minutes. Uncover and bake until the bread is brown on the outside, about 10 minutes longer. Remove the loaf from the pot and cool on a wire rack for an hour before slicing.

*What flours can I use in no-knead bread?

To simplify the recipe, you can substitute King Arthur brand bread flour in place of the semolina, 00, or all-purpose flour. You may need to adjust the rise time for the dough to double in size, so watch carefully

Serving: 1sliceCalories: 127kcal (6%)Carbohydrates: 26g (9%)Protein: 4g (8%)Fat: 1g (2%)Saturated Fat: 1g (6%)Polyunsaturated Fat: 1gMonounsaturated Fat: 1gSodium: 293mg (13%)Potassium: 50mg (1%)Fiber: 1g (4%)Sugar: 1g (1%)Vitamin A: 1IUVitamin C: 1mg (1%)Calcium: 6mg (1%)Iron: 1mg (6%)

Recipe Testers’ Reviews

Originally published October 6, 2017

#leitesculinaria on Instagram If you make this recipe, snap a photo and hashtag it #LeitesCulinaria. We’d love to see your creations on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Copyright © All rights reserved. | Newsphere by AF themes.